Suck it, Aristotle.

Suck it, Aristotle.

Akratic Cycles is a reference to Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics, specifically akrasia, which he takes to mean a sort of weakness that prevents a person from acting according to what they hold to be best principles. Akratic Cycles, however, takes akrasia not as a weakness, but simply as the tendency (no moral weight) to act against one's own best principles. There is a strength, an admirable and wholly human strength in that tendency. In fact, if you were looking for a really succinct definition of the purest form of courage, you could do worse than "to act against your own best principles."  In the political climate after the Trump election, I feel that it is critical to note that akrasia is the tendency to act against best principles, not the act of doing so. I will not blame a Trump voter for wanting to vote for Trump. I do blame them for actually doing so. It seems that in many cases, they actually thought that they were acting in their own interests.

You want to ride your bike to work every day all year? Awesome. Wisdom, a traditional virtue and common mainstay of many best principles, would advise that you drive or take public transit occasionally. Temperance, also, would advise moderating your exposure to the risks inherent in riding. Nope. You want to ride a single bike on roads, single track, and gravel while maintaining responsive and agile handling? Awesome. Wisdom, again, would recommend several different bicycles. Nope. You want a bike that you can mash around town comfortably, unbothered by potholes, curbs, or drivetrain maintenance? Awesome. Let me come up with a good way to do bad things. I put burritos and 40s in my Rapha jacket pockets all the time. 

 

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